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    2. Opensource pms final

      Choice of Laboratory Rodent Diet May Confound Data Interpretation and Reproducibility

      mike
      By Michael A. Pellizzon, Ph.D.

      Michael A Pellizzon and Matthew R Ricci
      Research Diets, Inc, New Brunswick, NJ, USA

      ABSTRACT
      The reproducibility of experimental data is challenged by many factors in both clinical and preclinical research. In preclinical studies, several factors may be responsible, and diet is one variable that is commonly overlooked, especially by those not trained in nutrition. In particular, grain-base diets contain complex ingredients, each of which can provide multiple nutrients, non-nutrients, and contaminants, which may vary from batch to batch. Thus, even when choosing the same grain-based diet used in the past by others, its composition will likely differ. In contrast, purified diets contain refined ingredients that offer the ability to control the composition much more closely and maintain consistency from one batch to the next, while minimizing the presence of non-nutrients and contaminants. In this article, we provide several different examples or scenarios showing how the diet choice can alter data interpretation, potentially affecting reproducibility and knowledge gained within any given field of study. Curr Dev Nutr 2020;4:nzaa031.

      Publication

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